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22 Responses

  1. Mari Nicole Rosales says:

    The notion that a manager has multiple points of accountability is incredibly important to remember. There can be times where us, as staff, can perhaps get frustrated at our direct managers for different reasons. Most of the time it may be that they are not getting back to us fast enough. Keeping in mind that our managers have multiple points of accountability, we are not their only staffers to manage; they could have many more! Because of this, we must understand that time is valuable when it comes to interacting with our direct managers. The idea of managing up allows us to complete our assigned tasks but also receive what we need from managers in a timely manner. Creating measurable action items that need to be completed by both the staffer and manager allows for time to not be wasted and rather maximized. Since a manager’s time is stretched in so many different ways, it is important to not waste this time and use it efficiently. This also greatly shows the influence managers have as leaders. We want and desire our managers to be great leaders, and them having multiple points of accountability is just a sliver of showing their leadership capabilities.

  2. Lia Raswork says:

    In Teamwork and leadership, there is the five stages theory of group development. The first stage is forming, this is where each individual in the team asks how they got chosen and why they are on the team. Usually, this is a managerial skill where the manager tries to maximize strength and minimize weaknesses of the potential team members. There is also a minimal standard and requirement to meet in a team. The second stage is storming, where there is team development after assembling the team. This is also where managers decide who is in charge and who isn’t in charge. There are power plays between the team members to see who has more power. The third stage is Norming, this is where the team starts working together and getting along. This is also where the leading people manage behaviors, making sure the team looks good to accomplish a goal. It also describes leadership as a process, and not a position. The fourth stage is Performing, when the team is performing well consistently to succeed. The fifth and last stage is Adjourning, this is the endpoint of the teams. This is usually where the teams celebrate the end of work.

  3. Isabella Miguel MGT 311 says:

    In the video I learned that teamwork is about everyone helping each other out. Most importantly, there are five stages of group development. The first part is forming and this is about everyone asking the question “ what’s in it for me.” Managers need to be sure to know why and how the teams can be efficient and effective to accomplish the goals. The manager decides who forms the team and this is very important since the group needs to maximize strengths. One of the most interesting parts that I learned was storming, since the team is already assembled and sometimes not the smartest people will make the team the most efficient. But sometimes, it is about how the team can be more efficient by bringing people together with different qualities and skills. And lastly, one of the main takeaways from the prezi video was that “ leadership is a process and not a position.” Leadership is learned through experience and most importantly by understanding the importance of it. For a company to be successful, the manager has to be able to understand his employees behaviors and also decide who goes in what team. I really enjoyed streaming the video since I learned so many new things, I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in the group process of a company to watch it.

  4. James Higgins says:

    The biggest takeaway I had from this video was in the forming section of group development. In this section, the main point is for leaders to maximize the strengths of the team and certain individuals, while minimizing the weaknesses of the team and certain individuals. For example, in sports, it is important for the coach to focus on the strengths of his team and develop a game plan centered around his team’s strengths to beat the opponent. However, on some occasions in sports, some coaches will instead develop a game plan centered around the opponent’s weaknesses instead of on his team’s strengths. While it is important to attack the opponent’s weaknesses, it should not be done in a way that takes away from your team’s strengths. If a coach focuses too much on attacking the opponent’s weaknesses, it could end up hurting his team by not focusing enough on his team’s strengths. Lastly, coaches need to “lead people and manage behaviors.” It is important for coaches of sports teams to lead the collective group, while managing the behaviors of certain individuals who require more attention. On a team, there will always be a few individuals who require more attention because of their skill level, personality, or because of certain circumstances the team is facing. As a leader, it is important to manage the behavior of those certain individuals so you can continue to lead the team on its collective goal of winning a championship.

  5. Daniela Rivera says:

    Within leadership and teamwork, there are the five stages of group development: forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. Forming begins on the individual level, where each person asks themselves why they are there and what’s in it for them. Storming is when the team is assembled, and now they are each finding their roles within the team. This part is isn’t just about assembling the best of the best, but the best of the best who can work cohesively. This is where everyone’s personalities come out. Norming is the stage where the leader can see what works best within the team. The team members are figuring out how to work alongside each other. Performing is when the team is, for lack of a better word, performing their tasks well under the guide of their leader. And adjourning is the closing step. This is the final celebration of a job well done by the team. My biggest takeaway is that leadership is a process, not a position. It isn’t immediate, and requires time to develop so that the team being led can be successful. The skill and knowledge that leaders have to put together well working teams is something to be applauded.

  6. Ava Zannino says:

    A team is meant to be a group of individuals that share a common goal and help each other out when necessary. However, in order to create that team, there are five stages you must go through so the group can develop as a whole. The first stage is Forming, this is the stage where everyone wonders why they are in this group and what they are going to get out of it. It is the manager’s job to select the right members so they can maximize their strengths together and know everyone’s attributes that will help the team accomplish their goal. The second stage is Storming, where the team development will begin. This is where the leaders are recognized as well as some resistance for power. Additional resistance may arise as a team as they may not know how to work together completely yet. The third stage is Norming, this is where the team begins to work together rather than as separate entities. The fourth stage is Performing, where the team is at their full potential and they can reach their end goal. The final stage adjourning is when the team has succeeded and celebrate their accomplishments.

  7. Madison Ambler says:

    In this presentation of Teamwork and Leadership you learn about the five stages of group development and why they are so important. The first stage is Forming, which describes how each individual determines why they were chosen and why they are on this specific team. The second stage is Storming, which is where the team is broken up into each of their specific rolls. This is where the leader of the team is established. The third stage is Norming, this is the stage where the team really comes together and starts working as a cohesive unit where everyone is doing their individual jobs to support the team. The fourth stage is Performing, where the team is using their combined skills to perform to the best of their ability and achieve success. The fifth and final stage is Adjourning, this is where the team celebrates the work that they have done together. In order for the boss to successfully put a group of people together on a project, understanding these stages and how they work together is very important.

  8. Bridget Beck says:

    The five-stage theory of group development can be broken down into forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. These five stages allow a group of individuals to come together and form their team to become successful in the project or company they are working on. The first stage is forming which begins with the individual. They ask themselves why they want to be a part of the group and what is in it for them at the end of the day. I understand this as the self-reflecting stage to show the importance of one’s participation in the group. Storming is the next stage where the group is formed and each member understands their responsibilities. This is when team development starts to happen. The storming stage is important to find who works the best together and who can shine where in the group. Norming is the next stage and this is when the team starts to work together and the leaders know how to make the group be the most successful. The next stage is performing and this is when the team has reached their full potential under their management and can perform at a high standard. The team at this point is right on track to achieve their goals. The final stage is adjourning and this is when the final goal is reached and the team is able to celebrate for all of their hard work and dedication. I believe that the most important step out of them all is the very first one, forming. Without the dedication of the individual, a group cannot be successful. It takes a team of hardworking individuals to make the goal at hand achievable.

  9. Gavin Monreale says:

    In these two presentations, we were presented with management basics and the five-stage theory of group performing. As Professor Yoest made clear, there are four main responsibilities of managers which are to plan, organize, control, and to manage. Though it may seem simple, these responsibilities can become very stressful because a manager has to answer to many people within an organization. Not only does a manager have to lead his employees, but he also has to communicate with his own bosses to ensure them that the business is running smoothly. In the other presentation, as I mentioned before, Professor Yoest talks about the five-stage theory of group performing. The fives stages are forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. In my opinion, the most difficult stage of group performing is norming. Norming is the second stage and is the stage in which team members must cohere with each other and they must be led by their manager. It may be very difficult for team members to mesh with one another; however, it much more difficult for a leader to manage all the different behaviors of a group. Professor Yoest made a great point in saying that management is a relationship process.

  10. Billy Duke says:

    Overall, I really enjoyed the discussion concerning group development and how important it is for groups to be analyzed and not simply thrown together. I greatly enjoyed Professor Yoest’s rowing metaphor and how he was able to show real world team connection and team building into an issue which is not physically visible. Along with this, I found it interesting how groups are developed and that it is not strange for the group to love one another. In fact, I truly agree that it is not strange for a group of people who are all aiming at the same goal to love one another. I have been on many groups in my life who have been on the same page so well that I grew to love each and every member of my team. The most interesting aspect of this love was that it was never perfect or only good results. We struggled, went through conflict, and overcame issues which challenged us to come together. I believe Professor Yoest displays this point extremely well that some of the best groups and teams in the world had a unique and special emotional bond with one another. Each member of the team has their own focus on individual responsibilities but at the end of the day come to gather as one in failure or success.

  11. Matt Tesoriero says:

    Leadership and teamwork is something that every team tries to carry out in order to be the most successful. The manager and his plan created are the key components to getting the best possible results. The manager has to make a plan and the decisions that come along with it. Along with this the manager is allowed to ask for recommendations in order to maximize plan potential. The manager has a key role in maximizing strength and minimizing weakness of the employees around and working on the plan. The employees are graded on their ability to be efficient with the task at hand, they have the responsibility to listen and comply with the plans the manager has given them, in order to get the most results out of the managers plan. On the other hand, managers have to be efficient in all sense of their plan. They have to make sure that the individual is working properly and that organization is being used. Organization is one of the most vital tools to success for a manager. Lastly I took away that relationships are very important to the manager as they need to make sure that people are happy, because when people are happy then your plan works smoothly. Overall, I took a lot of key information about the leadership and teamwork within a team and how it translates into results.

  12. Chris Talamini-Kelemen says:

    The team development process is something that I have found to be particularly interesting, but also incredibly accurate when I have applied the concepts to teams that I’ve been a part of. Additionally, I can take this one step further to say that understanding this team building process is an incredible practical skill that has helped me in working within a team and in creating teams. However, I have never been taught the adjourning phase before, and I thought it was fascinating to learn about and consider how this step can affect future team development. One of the biggest takeaways from understanding team development has been knowing how to better select members for a team. Role ambiguity is a common problem, and it happens often when like-minded people are selected to be on the same team. While it can be frustrating when group members don’t think alike or operate alike to myself, I have learned to appreciate the importance of diversity and the team’s success. This may be an unpopular opinion, but I think the storming phase is the most important one. There is so much growth from an individual and group basis that occurs from the storming process, and I think that is a valuable step.

  13. Blanca Zelaya says:

    It is clear that both of the presentations by Professor Yoest address teamwork and administration. The first video, Leadership & Teamwork, speaks about leadership in private and public divisions. In the video, the professor mentions the five-stage theory of group development, which involves: forming, storming, performing, norming, and adjourning. These are crucial to progress with team plans and overall goals. Each of these stages assists in achieving a smooth transition to get to end goals for a company. Forming is vital to have to reach cohesiveness and to learn about other people, and storming is necessary to have to solve a disagreement in a team or challenging others; performing is essential to work as a group, and norming is necessary to make others feel involved, and adjourning to make sure everyone complete each task. The second video, Management Basics, discusses management’s importance while speaking about the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Planning is crucial because it prepares an action or objective to be set. Organizing is equally essential because it establishes projects. Leading is one of the most important elements because it manages teams and helps people work toward the team’s goal. Lastly, controlling is necessary to observe the development of the team.

  14. Juan Mier says:

    In sports teams, both traditional and e-sports (which I am more familiar with), many teams have tried to form “super-teams”. They invest in acquiring the best players they possibly can, creating unrealistic expectations from the fans that are nearly impossible to meet. When the season comes and teams start to play, “super-teams” are often beaten by teams who have played together longer, have stronger team synergy, or simply have players whose skills overlap better with each other. As we learned in this short lecture, the “best” players do not always make for the best team. Those “super-teams” are often lacking in the storming and norming processes compared to other teams. In Overwatch, one of the most popular e-sports, the San Francisco Shock have won two of the three seasons of the Overwatch League. In both of those seasons, other teams were the “favorites” to win, but the Shock would consistently beat all of them. It was later revealed that the players on the team are actually very close friends who know each other very well, and their coach is regarded as the best in the league. In cases like these, teamwork and synergy surpass raw talent.

  15. Gisselle Barreto says:

    This was a very interesting presentation and I have definitely seen those 5 steps in group projects before. But from the 5 I believe storming and performing are the most important. Storming is where a team is already put together and personalities are being revealed. Also, where ideas are being shared to try and find a balance. This stage really sets the tone for the rest of the group project by establishing certain expectations. As well as comradery because at this point the group members have formed ideas about everyone in their team so it is important to give great first impressions in a sense. Essentially, the group will carry this important tone to the norming change where roles are determined and cooperation stabilizes. Performing is also very important because this is where the project is actually being worked on and the team is working as a unit towards the same common goal. Trust is higher at this point and conflicts are dealt with accordingly. Without storming and performing, the group process would lack a base and purpose because groups would still be stuck in the forming stage and not move forward to accomplishing the tasks assigned to them.

  16. Jose O Grijalva says:

    Creating a team is always complicated since it is something new, and whenever there is something new there is always confusion. For years, leaders have tried to make team formation more natural by creating norms that will allow a group of individuals to come together as a group with an end goal. Nowadays we have the five-stage theory of group development to ensure an easy transition from individualism to teamwork. The five-stage theory goes from, forming to storming to norming, then performing and finishing with adjourning.
    In either of the first three stages where a leader is born. And as it was said in the video leader is a process, not a position. So not in every team the person wearing the title of a leader is necessarily the leader. Sometimes someone within the team with a lower rank is actually the leader. Here is where volunteering becomes a key factor. Volunteers usually become factor leaders of the group. That is why, as said in the Memo, volunteering is very important since it will not only get recognition and admiration from peers but also since it will give some leader authority/power to whoever volunteers especially when a team is in the early stages of formation.

  17. Jose Grijalva says:

    Creating a team is always complicated since it is something new, and whenever there is something new there is always confusion. For years, leaders have tried to make team formation more natural by creating norms that will allow a group of individuals to come together as a group with an end goal. Nowadays we have the five-stage theory of group development to ensure an easy transition from individualism to teamwork. The five-stage theory goes from, forming to storming to norming, then performing and finishing with adjourning.
    In either of the first three stages where a leader is born. And as it was said in the video leader is a process, not a position. So not in every team the person wearing the title of a leader is necessarily the leader. Sometimes someone within the team with a lower rank is actually the leader. Here is where volunteering becomes a key factor. Volunteers usually become factor leaders of the group. That is why, as said in the Memo, volunteering is very important since it will not only get recognition and admiration from peers but also since it will give some leader authority/power to whoever volunteers especially when a team is in the early stages of formation.

  18. Isabella Del Peschio says:

    Professor Yoests short Prezi video on Leadership & Team Work: Forming, Storming, Norming, Conforming, and Adjourning was very interesting. I learned a lot about the role that managers play and how it is different from the role of a worker. Yoest explained that management is not mechanical, it is relationships. This is because management is a people process, as managers work with people to get things done. Additionally, managers cannot just bark out orders and their subordinates, instead managers need to persuade and need to understand the challenges the staff might be going through. This will help the manager to form relationships that are built off trust. The alert student should walk away knowing that managers job is to make decisions, role is relationships, the manager plans, organizes, leads and controls. However, all this means that my boss will have multiple points of accountability. Yoest suggests giving managers a special grace because they have work to do and another boss and another boss etc. I think it is necessary to give your boss some credit because they may be under a lot of pressure that a worker might not know about. It is important to remember that managers get things done through other people.

  19. Ryan Gilfillan says:

    In the first Prezi Professor Yoest brought up the five-stage theory of group development which including forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. In order for a team to be successful they must use each of these five to engage with a problem to find a solution. Forming comes down to yourself as the individual on the team and really is the ask why you are on the team or what do you bring to the table. Storming is when each individual sees what responsibilities or skills they bring to the team to give them the best fit so they can be of the most use. At this point the team is forming because now each person that is proficient in something will earn that role. Norming is now when the group starts to take off and become one. Now there are leaders on the team directing each person in their area. Performing is where “Teamwork makes the dream work” so to speak. It is when the team is at its peak under its leadership and management while performing at a high level. Adjourning is when the team can look back on the impact they have made and feel satisfied in its work. Out of all five I think that Forming is one of the biggest steps. Without the individual buying into the team goals and having the effort the team would break down. It is important in the real world to surround yourself with good people that will make you better.

  20. Jason Robertson says:

    Throughout both of the presentations, leadership and teamwork were among the key aspects touched on during this. The importance of teamwork and leadership in an organization is explained through 5 simple team development concepts laid out by Pr. Yoest, our management professor. These five categories of team development are known as the Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, and Adjourning stages. Each individual concept goes hand in hand with the other and helps achieve goals in the company. In the second presentation, our Management professor talks about the 4 managerial functions while leading others. Planning, Organizing, Leading, and Controlling are all individual concepts that coincide with each other and are put to use in our daily lives when managing people. These 4 concepts play a crucial role in the running of a smooth organization. This process gives leaders a way to achieve long term goals that they have within the company and its employees. These traits can help with teamwork in a company and can promote relationships within the organization that are in fact good and increase team development and the overall status of the organization. Having good relationships with one another builds trust within the organization which is one of the most important concepts to have as a manager.

  21. Marie Adam says:

    The five stage theory of a group is something that I seldom paid attention but it definitely makes more sense to see that some individuals in the team take a more pro-active role than others in order to run the process and communication smoothly. Instead of having one leader on a team while the rest are followers, there is a transition and some sort of shared power because of other people backing up the leader. When each individual has a role, it becomes less ambiguous to decide who is doing what, the organization of the tasks gets in sync with each others’ responsibilities.

  22. Luke D'Ambrogi says:

    I thought this was a very informational video using both “The Memo” and the metaphor of the rowing team. I like the metaphor of the rowing team because it has a lot of different things to which people can relate. The first of these is the sports aspect. Most people that come into a business have played sports at some point in their life, and a lot of people watch sports, as well. Thus, people can relate to sports analogies and the different aspects of them, such as a leader/coach, teammates, and a common goal of winning. The next aspect people can relate to about a rowing team is the coxswain. People have a leader in their life no matter what, whether it be their parents, a coach, a boss, or a manager. Therefore, they can relate to the coxswain at the front of the boat leading the rowers in order to be as fast and as efficient as possible. I also enjoyed learning about Tuckman’s model of group development. I thought the four stages were very informative and helpful in personifying development and the different stages in the process of becoming as efficient as possible. In short, I thought the video was effective in teaching leadership and teamwork.

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